Sunday, May 28, 2017

Roswell craft had spider silk type of synthetic covering similar to Kevlar now (The Day After Roswell) Corso

The last article reminded me of what Corso said about the covering of the Roswell Craft and how it was more plastic and web like like a spiders web woven with incredible strength and able to stretch and not break. So, likely this
 Aluminum polymer composite 
likely is moving in this direction too. So, imagine using a large enough 3d printer solar powered by the sun in space and weaving your own crafts that can withstand unknowable at present stress loads to travel to the nearest star.

So, all you would have to do is to get the 3d printer parts and something like Aluminum polymer composite up into space then assemble it (because whatever you built would never have to withstand earth's gravity if it was only going to travel between planets or stars and never land on a planet. So, it could be constructed in very interesting ways. However, using our present propulsion systems if you were not using the magnetic fields of planets and suns for propulsion through some kind of gravitic or magnetic propulsion likely you still would need metal parts for the propulsion system to keep it from melting the aluminum polymer composite in space from the combustion of present propulsion systems that were not gravity based or magnetic in nature.

Aluminum polymer composite: (used for 3d printing objects especially strong)

My understanding of this is that when coated with a layer of aluminum oxide it can withstand impressive loads.

begin quote from wikipedia:

Aluminum polymer composite

Aluminum polymer composite

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An aluminum polymer composite (APC) material combines aluminum with a polymer to create materials with interesting characteristics. In 2014 researchers used a 3d laser printer to produce a polymer matrix. When coated with a 50-100 nanometer layer of aluminum oxide, the material was able to withstand loads of as much as 280 megapascals, stronger than any other known material whose density was less than 1,000 kilograms per cubic metre (1,700 lb/cu yd), that of water.[1][2]

Contents

Aluminum foam

Spherical aluminum foam pieces bonded by polymers produced foams that were 80-95% metal. Such foams were test=manufactured on an automated assembly line and are under consideration as automobile parts.[citation needed]

Thermal conductivity

Experimentally determined thermal conductivity of specific APCs matched both the Agari and Bruggeman models provide a good estimation for thermal conductivity. The experimental values of both thermal conductivity and diffusivity have shown a better heat transport for the composite filled with large particles.[3]

See also

References


  • Rathi, Akshat (2014-02-03). "New laser-printed material is lighter than water, as strong as steel". Ars Technica. Retrieved 2014-02-14.
    1. Boudenne, A.; Ibos, L.; Fois, M.; Gehin, E.; Majeste, J. C. (2004). "Thermophysical properties of polypropylene/aluminum composites". Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics. 42 (4): 722–732. doi:10.1002/polb.10713.

    External links

    Navigation menu


  • Bauer, J.; Hengsbach, S.; Tesari, I.; Schwaiger, R.; Kraft, O. (2014). "High-strength cellular ceramic composites with 3D microarchitecture". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 111: 2453–2458. doi:10.1073/pnas.1315147111. PMC 3932926Freely accessible. PMID 24550268.

  • I think unfortunately more and more nations are going to think the U.S. under Trump has no credibility

    Though it is starting with the heads of Europe and England now it likely will quickly spread to other nations as they all one by one lose faith with Trump as president because he has no credibility at all now from anyone anywhere. In this he resembles more the presidents of dictatorships who only lie all the time worldwide sort of like Erdogan after destroying his democracy there in Turkey completely since he faked his government take over last summer.

    nytimes:Merkel, After Discordant G-7 Meeting, Is Looking Past Trump

    1. begin quote from:

      Merkel, After Discordant G-7 Meeting, Is Looking Past Trump - The...

      www.nytimes.com/2017/05/28/world/europe/angela-merke...
      7 hours ago ... Merkel, After Discordant G-7 Meeting, Is Looking Past Trump ... BERLIN — German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Europe's most ... Receive occasional updates and special offers for The New York Times's products and services. 
      Photo
      Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany in Munich on Sunday. “The times in which we could rely fully on others, they are somewhat over,” she said. Credit Christian Bruna/European Pressphoto Agency
      BERLIN — Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, Europe’s most influential leader, has concluded, after three days of trans-Atlantic meetings, that the United States of President Trump is not the reliable partner her country and the Continent have automatically depended on in the past.
      Clearly disappointed with Mr. Trump’s positions on NATO, Russia, climate change and trade, Ms. Merkel said in Munich on Sunday that traditional alliances were no longer as steadfast as they once were and that Europe should pay more attention to its own interests “and really take our fate into our own hands.”
      “The times in which we could rely fully on others — they are somewhat over,” Ms. Merkel added, speaking on the campaign trail after a contentious NATO summit meeting in Brussels and a Group of 7 meeting in Italy. “This is what I experienced in the last few days.”
      Ms. Merkel’s strong comments were a potentially seismic shift in trans-Atlantic relations. With the United States less willing to intervene overseas, Germany is becoming an increasingly dominant power in a partnership with France.
      Continue reading the main story
      The new French president, Emmanuel Macron, has shown a willingness to work with Germany and to help lead the bloc out of its troubles. And Ms. Merkel sees Germany’s future more and more with the European Union of 27 nations, without Britain after its vote to leave the bloc.
      “This seems to be the end of an era, one in which the United States led and Europe followed,” said Ivo H. Daalder, a former United States envoy to NATO who is now the director of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. “Today, the United States is heading into a direction on key issues that seems diametrically opposite of where Europe is heading. Merkel’s comments are an acknowledgment of that new reality.”
      Ms. Merkel’s emphasis on the need of Europe to stand up for its own interests comes after Mr. Trump declined to publicly endorse NATO’s doctrine of collective defense or to agree to common European positions on global trade, dealing with Russian aggression or mitigating the effects of climate change.
      “We have to know that we must fight for our future on our own, for our destiny as Europeans,” Ms. Merkel said.
      Ms. Merkel, who did not mention Mr. Trump by name, also spoke of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, which means the bloc will lose its second-largest economy and one of its two nuclear powers. Britain’s departure will also weaken trans-Atlantic ties and leave the Continent more exposed than before.
      Given this new context for international relations, she said, “I can only say that we Europeans must really take our fate into our own hands — of course in friendship with the United States of America, in friendship with Great Britain and as good neighbors wherever that is possible also with other countries, even with Russia.”
      With her statement, she seemed to be calling for German voters to get accustomed to a more active European role — and to more involvement by Berlin in crises on the Continent as well as global ones affecting Europe’s future. Ms. Merkel is seeking a fourth term as chancellor ahead of parliamentary elections in September.
      Ms. Merkel was known to have been unsettled by her meetings with Mr. Trump in Washington in March, and she had been concerned that if Marine Le Pen won the French presidency this month, Germany would be isolated and the European Union badly damaged.
      But Mr. Macron, who was meeting Mr. Trump for the first time, appeared to have a less negative impression of the outcome of the talks than Ms. Merkel. In a news conference at the end of the Group of 7 conference, Mr. Macron took a glass-half-full approach, saying that he believed, over all, that despite Mr. Trump’s earlier hostile language toward NATO, multilateralism was intact and there was a shared vision in a number of areas.
      Mr. Trump campaigned on a platform of trade protectionism, nationalism and skepticism about multilateralism and climate change — all issues on which most European leaders disagree with him. Europeans also depend on NATO for their ultimate defense and are more concerned about an increasingly aggressive Russia than Mr. Trump seems to be, although his defense secretary and national security adviser, both senior military officers, insist that the president is fully behind NATO’s Article 5, which requires all members to come to the defense of any country in the alliance that is attacked.
      Mr. Daalder said: “This is ‘America first’ — a policy focused on narrow self-interest — and abandons the idea that the best way to enhance our security and prosperity is by having strong allies and leading globally in pursuit of common values and interests.”

      Document

      The G-7 Statement on the Paris Accords

      In the document addressing the climate pact and other topics, six nations reaffirmed their commitment to cutting planet-warming emissions.
      OPEN Document
      As they traveled back to the United States over the weekend, White House officials said Mr. Trump had succeeded in delivering a blunt message about self-reliance to American allies in Europe.
      They said the president’s decision to scold the NATO member countries about their contributions to the defense alliance would reduce the need for the United States to carry the financial burden for the Continent’s defense. And they said the president’s tough position on trade would help protect American companies from unfair practices.
      “This was a summit in which the goals and priorities of the United States and the president really were felt deeply,” said a senior administration official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the president’s discussions with other leaders. Mr. Trump “has changed the way many people around the world are thinking about these issues.”
      White House officials expressed little concern about the personal interactions between the president and other heads of state. The administration official said Mr. Trump had built “an extraordinary rapport with the other leaders.”
      Ms. Merkel seemed particularly upset with Mr. Trump’s refusal to endorse language supporting free trade and backing the Paris climate accord in the Group of 7 declaration after talks in Taormina, Sicily. There have been reports that Mr. Trump intends to abandon the 195-nation climate deal agreed upon in 2015, arguing that it hurts the American economy.
      The climate accord was the most vivid sign of division between the United States and its allies. But Mr. Trump, in Brussels, also repeated comments that Germany was “very bad” because of its trade surplus and the fact that some German car companies manufacture in Mexico for importing into the United States, even though many of them produce cars in American factories with American workers.
      On Saturday, Ms. Merkel was unusually direct in discussing what she called unsatisfying talks on climate change, which is an important issue for many German voters and a hallmark topic for the chancellor, who first made her mark in the 1990s shepherding an international accord on the environment.
      Ms. Merkel’s disappointment on the issue was not entirely shared by Mr. Macron, who said Mr. Trump had at least listened to the arguments of the other G-7 leaders.
      Ms. Merkel, however, sounded a somewhat bleaker note. “The whole discussion about climate was very difficult, not to say unsatisfactory,” she said. “There’s a situation where it’s six, if you count the European Union, seven, against one.”
      “This is not just any old agreement, but it is a central agreement for shaping globalization,” she said. “There are no signs of whether the U.S. will stay in the Paris accords or not.”
      Mr. Macron, 39, told the French news media that his now-famous handshake tussle with Mr. Trump was a deliberate effort to show that he could not be pushed around by the American president. He told the Sunday newspaper Journal du Dimanche that it was “a moment of truth” — designed to show that he is no pushover, and a message for the European Union leadership, as well.
      “My handshake with him — it wasn’t innocent,” Mr. Macron said. “One must show that you won’t make small concessions, even symbolic ones, but also not over-publicize things, either.”
      The budding Merkel-Macron relationship is important, and Ms. Merkel has moved quickly to embrace him, conscious that he must still try to win a legislative majority in elections next month to be an effective partner. The European Union has traditionally been at its strongest when its two biggest continental powers work closely in tandem.
      Accordingly, Ms. Merkel and her top aides held a bilateral meeting on Friday night in Sicily with Mr. Macron and his top officials, German officials said. Most strikingly, the spouses of the two leaders also attended. It is rare for Ms. Merkel’s husband, Joachim Sauer, to accompany her on trips abroad — something she said recently that he decides. Brigitte Macron is new to the role of France’s first lady, but Mr. Macron has credited her with giving him valuable political advice.
      In general, Mr. Macron — who will meet with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia on Monday at Versailles outside Paris — has stressed friendship with Germany, appointing German speakers to critical positions, including prime minister, chief foreign policy adviser and defense minister. The newly elected president also kept the tradition of paying his first official visit to Berlin, doing so on his first full day in office.
      As for Mr. Trump, he says the trip was a resounding success. On Sunday, after being restrained on Twitter while abroad, he returned to form, unleashing a barrage of posts. Among them: “Just returned from Europe. Trip was a great success for America. Hard work but big results!”
      Mr. Daalder disagreed. “The president’s failure to endorse Article 5 in a speech at NATO headquarters, his continued lambasting of Germany and other allies on trade, his apparent decision to walk away from the Paris climate agreement — all suggest that the United States is less interested in leading globally than has been the case for the last 70 years,” he said.
      Continue reading the main story

      Related Coverage

    In NATO Speech, Trump Is Vague About Mutual Defense Pledge


    Sunday May 28th 2017: The most read articles at this site during the last 24 hours

     

    Merkel warns Europe not to rely on Trump's US because it isn't credible

    1. If I were Merkel would I think the U.S. government is credible now? No!

      If I were Putin I would be laughing about now because he has succeeded in driving now a wedge between Europe and the U.S. by putting Trump into office. Yes!

      Is anything Trump EVER says Credible? No!

      It isn't. And if you say it is you are not among the middle class or poor of this nation and you likely are white. Because everyone else knows Trump cannot be trusted at all. 

      Will most other nations follow suit with Germany soon? Yes.

      Why? 

      Because the U.S. is in the middle of a governmental revolution right now and our government cannot be trusted as long as Trump and his administration are in office. 

      This is a disaster for the U.S. and a much worse disaster for the whole world. This is how the world order since World War II now ends through Putin putting Trump in place to completely destroy the world order. It is 100 times worse now for the whole world than it is even for people here in the U.S. Just watch and see now what happens!

       

      Why are ANY Republicans putting up with this?

      It's about demographics. There are no longer enough white Republican Americans to actually be a majority now to put ANY Republican in place as a U.S. president without Putin's help and manipulation of our electoral process! 

      It's all about White Republicans maintaining power when they no longer have enough Republican white votes to do it.

      It's very similar now to how Putin keeps Assad in power by genociding all Sunni Muslims in Syria who are the majority of Syrians there too!

      begin quote from:

      Merkel warns Europe can no longer rely on Trump's US | Daily Mail...

      www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4550106/Merkel-warns-Europe...
      5 hours ago ... Angela Merkel has stunningly claimed Europe can no longer rely on the US, just one day Donald Trump frustrated world leaders at the G7 ... 

      Merkel vs Trump: German leader warns that Europe can no longer rely on Donald's America and says its leaders must take 'destiny into our own hands' after stormy G7 Summit

      • Merkel came to the realization after what she 'experienced in the past few days'
      • The German leader had spent time with Donald Trump during the G7 Summit 
      • 'The times in which we can fully count on others are somewhat over,' she said 
      • Merkel described her frustration with Trump's failure to agree to a deal that would see the US remain in the Paris climate accord as 'very unsatisfactory'
      Angela Merkel has dramatically signaled a move away from Donald Trump - saying Europe can no longer rely on America.
      It comes just one day after Trump left a stormy G7 Summit in Italy, in which he frustrated Merkel and the other leaders in attendance with his stance towards security, climate change and tax.
      The German Chancellor urged the European Union to stick together in the face of new uncertainty stemming from the US and other challenges.
      Merkel said Sunday at a campaign event in Bavaria: 'The times in which we can fully count on others are somewhat over, as I have experienced in the past few days.' 
      Scroll down for video 
      Angela Merkel is pictured speaking during an election event in Munich on Sunday 
      Angela Merkel is pictured speaking during an election event in Munich on Sunday 
      Angela Merkel takes a sip of her beer after delivering a speech to the Christian Democratic Union and the Christian Social Union in Munich on Sunday
      Angela Merkel takes a sip of her beer after delivering a speech to the Christian Democratic Union and the Christian Social Union in Munich on 

      WHAT COULD MERKEL'S TOUGH TALK MEAN FOR THE WORLD ?

      The roots of the current relationship between America and Europe go back to world war two and the cold war - when NATO was formed to protect Western Europe from a Soviet invasion.
      Since the end of World War II, Europe has increasingly relied on America's military might for its defense. Close cooperation through NATO fostered a strong economic and social bond between the member nations. 
      However, Trump has loudly complained about European nations not paying their fair share of the cost of their defense.
      Now that Merkel has signaled she is moving away from Trump, it could mean a shift in the wider world order. America and Western Europeans countries have traditionally driven the world's agenda - now this could change as Trump and Merkel move further apart.   
      The comments came after the G7 countries were unable to agree to a deal that would see the 2015 Paris climate accords upheld. 
      Merkel on Saturday labelled the result of the 'six against one' discussion 'very difficult, not to say very unsatisfactory'.
      Trump, who routinely promised during his campaign to abandon the plan, said he needed more time to decide on a path forward. However, he has reportedly told multiple people in private he will withdraw the US from the agreement, according to Axios.
      Trump tweeted Saturday morning to say he would announce his 'final decision' on the accord this week.
      He also reportedly described German trade practices as 'bad, very bad,' in Brussels talks last week, complaining that Europe's largest economy sells too many cars to the US.
      Merkel's speech on Sunday seemed to reflect her changed opinion towards the US under Trump.  
      Merkel said Sunday at a campaign event in Bavaria: 'The times in which we can fully count on others are somewhat over, as I have experienced in the past few days'
      Merkel said Sunday at a campaign event in Bavaria: 'The times in which we can fully count on others are somewhat over, as I have experienced in the past few days'
      Trump talks to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, and Tunisia's President Beji Caid Essebsi, second from left, at a G7 Summit expanded session in Taormina on Italy, May 27
      Trump talks to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, and Tunisia's President Beji Caid Essebsi, second from left, at a G7 Summit expanded session in Taormina on Italy, May 27
      Angela Merkel looks on as she is stood next to Donald Trump while waiting to have a photograph taken on Friday as part of the G7 meeting
      Angela Merkel looks on as she is stood next to Donald Trump while waiting to have a photograph taken on Friday as part of the G7 meeting
      German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau share a laugh during the G7 Summit in Italy on Saturday
      German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau share a laugh during the G7 Summit in Italy on Saturday

      DONALD TRUMP'S HISTORY OF TOUGH TALK ON NATO

      Donald Trump (pictured with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg on May 25 in Brussels) has repeatedly attacked NATO - but his criticisms have not always been accurate
      Donald Trump (pictured with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg on May 25 in Brussels) has repeatedly attacked NATO - but his criticisms have not always been accurate
      Trump repeatedly bashed NATO during his campaign and since he took office, accuses countries of 'not paying their share' and bashing the group as 'obsolete'.
      He made the 'obsolete' comment in the wake of the Brussels terrorist attack in 2016. In an interview this April, Trump claimed he called the organization that because it did not 'focus on terrorism'.
      However, NATO issued its first formal declaration on counter-terrorism in 1980, and it reviewed the 'terror blueprint' in 2012. 
      It stated at the time: 'The Alliance strives at all times to remain aware of the evolving threat from terrorism; to ensure it has adequate capabilities to prevent, protect against, and respond to terrorist threats.' 
      But despite that incorrect statement, Trump still lectured the other leaders in person on Thursday, declaring: 'Many of these nations owe massive amounts of money from past years.'
      But most notably in his speech, he also did not offer an explicit public endorsement of NATO’s Article 5, 'all for one, one for all' collective defense principle - which means an attack against one country in the group is seen as an attack on all.
      During his time as a candidate, Trump had suggested the US might only come to the defense that meet the alliance’s spending guidelines - for committing two per cent of their gross domestic product to military spending.
      Last year, only five of the 28 countries met the goal: the US, Greece, Britain, Estonia and Poland.
      Fellow NATO leaders occasionally exchanged awkward looks with each other during the president’s lecture on Thursday, which occurred at an event commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall and the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. 
      NATO officials had expected Trump to raise the payments issue during Thursday’s meeting, even preparing Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg for the prospect that the president could try to pull off a stunt like handing out invoices. 
      Trump repeatedly bashed NATO during his campaign and since he took office, accuses countries of 'not paying their share' and bashing the group as 'obsolete'. He is pictured on April 12 at the White House
      Trump repeatedly bashed NATO during his campaign and since he took office, accuses countries of 'not paying their share' and bashing the group as 'obsolete'. He is pictured on April 12 at the White House
      But one European official said NATO members were still taken aback by the aggressive tone of his speech.
      Since his international tour has wrapped up, the Associated Press explained how many of Trump's claims about the defense organization are untrue.
      His comment about countries 'owning' money was the first to be found wanting by a fact-check. 
      Members of the alliance are not in arrears in their military spending, nor are they in debt to the US, or failing to meet a current standard, and Washington is not trying to collect anything, despite the president’s contention.
      In a similar fashion, Trump tweeted this week 'pour in' for NATO since he took office. 
      He picked up on that thread on Saturday, telling soldier at a US base in Italy: 'I will tell you, a big difference over the last year, money is actually starting to pour into NATO from countries that would not have been doing what they’re doing now had I not been elected, I can tell you that. Money is starting to pour in.'
      But again, that is not true, according to the Associated Press. 
      No money is pouring into the organization and countries do not pay the US, nor do they pay NATO directly, apart from administrative expenses, which are not the issue.
      The issue is how much each NATO member country spends on its own defense.
      Although the president is right that many NATO countries have agreed to spend more on their military budgets, that is not a result of the NATO summit this past week at which Trump pressed them to do so. 
      The two per cent goal was committed to in 2014, during the Obama administration.
      During her remarks, the German leader emphasized the need for friendly relations with the US, Britain and Russia, but added: 'We Europeans must really take our destiny into our own hands.'
      Merkel and Trump have had a frosty relationship, with the Celebrity Apprentice executive producer having called the German leader a 'disaster'.
      'What's happening in Germany, I always thought Merkel was like this great leader. What she's done in Germany is insane. It is insane,' he said in 2015. 
      Donald Trump and Angela Merkel appear to be in the middle of a tense conversation at the G7 Summit on Friday
      Donald Trump and Angela Merkel appear to be in the middle of a tense conversation at the G7 Summit on Friday
      German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends an election campaign event on Sunday, May 28
      Donald Trump greets German Chancellor Angela Merkel as they attend a round table meeting of G7 leaders and Outreach partners at the Hotel San Domenico during a G7 summit in Taormina, Italy on Saturday, May 27
      Merkel and Trump have clashed in the past, with the reality television producer calling the German leader a 'disaster'
      The comment directly contradicted what he said just two months earlier, when he described Merkel as: 'fantastic... highly respected'.
      Trump also refused to shake Merkel's hand during an awkward photo opportunity at the White House this year. 
      As the two were sat in front of a pack of photographers, Merkel could be heard saying to Trump: 'Do you want to have a handshake?'
      There was no response from the president, who instead looked ahead with his hands clasped.