Wednesday, June 7, 2017

If you look back at Watergate Nixon didn't go to jail but many in his administration did

Likewise, it is quite likely Trump will never see jail time for anything he might be responsible for, just like Nixon didn't either. This is because the presidency itself must be protected at all costs for many many different reasons. On one level it doesn't matter who is president the office itself needs to be protected in many ways just so it can remain worthwhile to have ANY president in office from any party in the future.

However, that doesn't mean many in Trump's Administration aren't going to jail and some likely will go bankrupt trying to defend themselves even if they are acquitted.

For example, just not answering questions in the Senate Hearing it is possible that Coats and the Head of the NSA could theoretically be held in "Contempt of Congress" at this point for not answering questions that they had no legal reason not to. If you look at the faces of Coats and the Naval NSA head you could see how the courage of their convictions they both knew might cost them jail time.

This is what happened during the Nixon resignation too.

begin quote from:
  1. Watergate Casualties and Convictions

    watergate.info/analysis/casualties-and-convictions
    In the aftermath of Richard Nixon's resignation, Watergate continued to claim ... John Erlichman (White House staff), resigned 30 April 1973, subsequently jailed.
  2. Watergate Seven - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watergate_Seven
    The Watergate Seven has two meanings: (1) it refers to the five men caught June 17, 1972 ... P. Weicker, Jr.'s indicating that one of the men in Watergate bugging case had been ordered in the spring of 1972 ... Nixon revealed much later that he would not grant amnesty to the Watergate Seven because, if he did so, Nixon ... 



    Watergate Casualties and Convictions

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    3
    In the aftermath of Richard Nixon’s resignation, Watergate continued to claim victims.
    The final toll included:

  3. one presidential resignation
  • one vice-presidential resignation – although Agnew’s crimes were unrelated to Watergate
  • 40 government officials indicted or jailed
  • H.R. Haldeman and John Erlichman (White House staff), resigned 30 April 1973, subsequently jailed
  • John Dean (White House legal counsel), sacked 30 April 1973, subsequently jailed
  • John Mitchell, Attorney-General and Chairman of the Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP), jailed
  • Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy (ex-White House staff), planned the Watergate break-in, both jailed
  • Charles Colson, special counsel to the President, jailed
  • James McCord (Security Director of CREEP), jailed

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