Friday, August 26, 2016

The top ten articles likely will stay the same for about a month or so at least

The main reason that the articles in the top ten at the top of the page haven't changed lately is thousands and thousands of people have visited them this summer. So, because the top 10 is based upon visits automatically in the programming of this site, the likelihood is that those articles won't change for at least 1 month or more because of the thousands and thousands of visits to the top 10 articles of the last 30 days. I just thought I should mention this. It has been an amazing summer in the number of visits to this site especially during the Republican and Democratic Conventions from my worldwide audience.

My thoughts on the changes to the world

Though I like to see Blonde hair and blue eyes or hazel eyes or lavender or green eyes and red hair and I have a daughter with red hair and blue eyes and a wife that is blonde with green eyes etc. I also realize that the more people on earth look more alike the less likely we will nuke this planet out of existence and all go extinct.

But, if we don't have enough birth control, overpopulation may drive us extinct like it is already in the Middle East from having more babies there than the land and water can actually support.

So, genocide likely will continue in the middle east of various sects there including all Christians until people start practicing enough birth control to bring down those populations to where the land can actually support with jobs and homes and food and water the people already there.

So, everyone looking similar on earth with all races combined into most people likely will reduce the chance of nuking earth out of existence. But, if birth control isn't instituted by governments it won't matter because we will go extinct by 2100 anyway on the present track we are on worldwide.

IF birth control isn't brought into being in all nations soon, not only will all animals and birds be gone soon but all insects and humans will be gone too by 2100 here on earth.

The more people realize we are presently in the 6th Great Extinction, the more people can do something about it because it isn't just animals and birds that are now going extinct it is us too if we don't do something soon.

trying to define Alt-Right?

The alt-right is a somewhat amorphous label for a what Southern Poverty Law Center defines as “a set of far-right ideologies, groups and individuals” whose core beliefs rest in the notion that “white identity” is under attack by “political correctness” and “social justice.” These forces are acting to “undermine white people and ‘their’ civilization,” according to the law center.
American Renaissance defines the alt-right as a “broad dissident movement” that rejects the principle that all people are equal. Race is central to its philosophy. Here’s American Renaissance in its own words:
The movement, called different things as it festered on the margins of politics for decades, appears to be gaining a boost during this presidential campaign. Google Trends shows interest in the search term “alt right” as very low from 2004 until about April 2015. Since then, searches for the term have quadrupled.

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The 'Alt-Right' Is Thrilled By Hillary Clinton's Denunciation

I'm thinking that the Alt-Right movement is a reaction and the blow back from Black rights, Brown rights, Yellow Rights and Red Rights and Women's rights. It is a realization of the death of the Republican parties ability to elect another President because of demographics. It is the horror of white people realizing they are going to have to share power with all the other races on earth. And the lack of birth control means white people who actually use birth control more are being bred into a minority.

Then you add the fact that when a white person breeds with any other race the first attributes lost are white skin, blonde or red hair and green or blue or hazel or lavender eyes and sometimes light brown hair.

So, white people who live in the middle of the U.S. often have never met or made friends with someone of another race and are socially unprepared for this outcome at present. Whereas people who live on the coasts of the U.S. or borders of the U.S. (North or South) are most used to dealing with other races and peoples from all countries on earth. So, people who are alt-right tend to be middle Americans for the most part or from the south.

The 'Alt-Right' Is Thrilled By Hillary Clinton's Denunciation

 
 
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Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s powerful denunciation Thursday of “alt-right” extremism that she said GOP opponent Donald Trump embraces was cheered by adherents of the political …

The ‘Alt-Right’ Is Thrilled By Hillary Clinton’s Denunciation

The attention shows “we’ve made it,” a neo-Nazi website declared.

08/25/2016 07:11 pm ET | Updated 8 hours ago
Carlo Allegri / Reuters
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s powerful denunciation Thursday of “alt-right” extremism that she said GOP opponent Donald Trump embraces was cheered by adherents of the political philosophy.
Clinton, linking Trump with white nationalists and a “radical fringe,” delivered a blistering attack on what she said was the alt-right’s takeover of the Republican Party. In doing so, she cast a spotlight on the obscure movement, thrusting it into mainstream political discussion.
“She is doing the white nationalism movement a great service by bringing attention to our issues to the forefront of political debate,” said William Johnson, a leader of the white nationalist American Freedom Party who was selected by Trump as a California delegate during the primary, but later resigned.
Jared Taylor, who helps run white nationalist online magazine American Renaissance, said he and those who share his beliefs “appreciate any publicity Mrs. Clinton gives us.”
“We have important things to say and are glad for any opportunity to speak to national audiences,” Taylor told HuffPost.
The Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website that calls itself “the world’s most visited alt-right website,” also cheered Clinton’s speech.
“Well guys. We’ve made it,” Daily Stormer founder Andrew Anglin wrote. “Hillary Clinton is giving a speech about us today.”
Richard Spencer, head of white nationalist think tank National Policy Institute who is credited with coining the term “alternative right,” wrote in an online journal that Clinton’s speech is “empowering.” The Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors extremist groups, calls National Policy Institute’s journal “racist.”
Moreover, according to Spencer, it may no longer be accurate to label the extreme right-wing ideology “alternative.”
At the Republican National Convention last month, where Trump formally accepted his party’s nomination, Spencer declared that alt-right had “taken over” the mainstream right.
Spencer celebrated that sentiment on Twitter Thursday, before Clinton’s speech.
On white nationalist website Stormfront, there was a call to use the #AltRightMeans tag to counter Clinton’s rhetoric about the movement. The hashtag was trending before and during Clinton’s speech.
The alt-right is a somewhat amorphous label for a what Southern Poverty Law Center defines as “a set of far-right ideologies, groups and individuals” whose core beliefs rest in the notion that “white identity” is under attack by “political correctness” and “social justice.” These forces are acting to “undermine white people and ‘their’ civilization,” according to the law center.
American Renaissance defines the alt-right as a “broad dissident movement” that rejects the principle that all people are equal. Race is central to its philosophy. Here’s American Renaissance in its own words:
The movement, called different things as it festered on the margins of politics for decades, appears to be gaining a boost during this presidential campaign. Google Trends shows interest in the search term “alt right” as very low from 2004 until about April 2015. Since then, searches for the term have quadrupled.
That’s at least in part related to the higher profile that white supremacy groups have received during Trump’s campaign, which has been criticized for not rejecting support from white supremacists like David Duke, the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard who encouraged other white nationalists to volunteer for Trump’s campaign.
Trump denies he’s a racist, but continues making racist remarks. His ever-changing immigration policies include the deportation of millions. He has pledged to ban Muslims from entering the U.S. And he has a habit of retweeting messages posted by white supremacists and sharing them with his 11.1 million Twitter followers.
Clinton’s speech also sparked a flood of news articles about the alt-right.
That widespread coverage is a “lottery win” for the extremists, Brian Levin, director for the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, told HuffPost. While pushing extremism into the mainstream conversation may be unpleasant, he said, it remains critical to show the extremism celebrating Trump’s candidacy. 
The alt-right, Levin said, is a “cobbled and somewhat amorphous movement that includes a core of bigots has infiltrated part of a mainstream political insurgency.” And as its profile rises, it must at the very least be reckoned with, he said.
“The fact that Euro-nationalism and all the horrendous bigotry that is tied to it has not just become an unwelcome visitor at the door of a major political party, but an occupant of the household, is of relevance not only for those partisans trying to defeat Republicans, but to those within the GOP who are alarmed that their presence is antithetical to their principles as well,” Levin said.
Editor’s note: Donald Trump regularly incites political violence and is a serial liar,rampant xenophobe, racist, misogynist and birther who has repeatedly pledged to ban all Muslims — 1.6 billion members of an entire religion — from entering the U.S.

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Trump campaign CEO once charged in domestic violence case

Trump campaign CEO once charged in domestic violence case
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Stephen K. Bannon, the new CEO of the Donald Trump campaign, was charged …
lede_Stephen_Bannon_1_ap_1160.jpg
A police report says that Bannon’s then-wife claimed he pulled at her neck and wrist during an altercation over their finances. | AP Photo

Trump campaign CEO once charged in domestic violence case

The 1996 charges were later dropped due to witness unavailability.
Stephen K. Bannon, the new CEO of the Donald Trump campaign, was charged with misdemeanor domestic violence, battery and dissuading a witness following an incident in early January 1996, though the case was ultimately dismissed, according to a police report and court documents.
The Santa Monica, Calif., police report says that Bannon’s then-wife claimed he pulled at her neck and wrist during an altercation over their finances, and an officer reported witnessing red marks on her neck and wrist to bolster her account. Bannon also reportedly smashed the phone when she tried to call the police.
While the case ended when Bannon's ex-wife did not appear in court, the incident presents a new problem for the Trump campaign following the hiring of the controversial Bannon. He went on leave from Breitbart News, where he is chairman, to take over the Trump campaign.
Bannon, through a spokeswoman, said he was never interviewed by the police about the incident. Bannon pleaded "not guilty" to the allegations and was represented by a local criminal defense attorney during the proceedings.
The couple — who had twin girls — were divorced shortly after the criminal charges were dropped in August 1996.
"The bottom line is he has a great relationship with the twins, he has a great relationship with the ex-wife, he still supports them," said Alexandra Preate, Bannon's spokeswoman.
On Jan. 1, 1996, according to the Santa Monica Police Department, police responded to Bannon’s home following a hangup during a 911 call. At the time, Bannon was heading up the Beverly Hills-based Bannon & Co., described in a Bloomberg profile as “a boutique investment bank specializing in media.”
Bannon’s then-wife, who POLITICO is not naming, answered the door at the home looking “very upset,” according to the police report.
According to the report, she said, “Oh, thank you, you are here. How did you know to come?” and took several minutes to compose herself.
Bannon, according to the report, was less than seven months into his second marriage, though the couple had known each other for a number of years prior to their April 1995 wedding. The couple just had twin girls seven months earlier, Bannon’s ex-wife told police at the time.
There had been a history of physical altercations in their relationship, Bannon’s then-wife relayed. "In the beginning of their relationship, she said they [had] 3 or 4 argument that became physical and they had been going to counseling. There has not been any physical abuse in their arguments for about the past 4 years. [REDACTED] said they have been arguing a lot, but no violence,” the police report states.
Bannon's ex-wife did not respond to emails and phone calls seeking comment.
According to the police report, on New Year’s morning 1996, Bannon’s then-wife asked for a credit card to go shopping, and they argued over whether she should just write a check. This quickly turned into a bigger argument about the couple’s finances and future.
"She told him that maybe he should find another place to live, that she wanted a divorce. [REDACTED] said he laughed at her, and said he would never move out,” the report states.
Bannon had gone out to their car, followed by his then-wife, the report says. She then spat at him, and Bannon “reached up to her from the driver’s seat of his car and grabbed her left wrist. He pulled her down, as if he was trying to pull [her] into the car, over the door."
"[REDACTED] said Mr. Bannon grabbed at neck, also pulling her into the car. She said that she started to fight back striking at his face so he would let go of her. After a short period of time she was able to get away from him,” the report states.
The ex-wife then entered the house and said she was calling 911. She was dialing the number when, the report states, Bannon “jumped over her and the twins to grab the phone from her. Once he got the phone, he threw it across the room,” and then left the house.
"[REDACTED] found the phone in several pieces and could not use it. She complained of soreness to her neck. I saw red marks on her left wrist and the right side of her neck. These were photographed,” the police report states, adding that the ex-wife declined an emergency protective order.
On Feb. 22, 1996, a complaint was filed against Bannon by the Santa Monica District Attorney’s office for misdemeanor domestic violence, battery, and dissuading a witness, according to Los Angeles County court dockets obtained by POLITICO.
The counts issued against Bannon in the domestic violence section include count 273.5(A), which according to the California Penal Code is “corporal injury resulting in a traumatic condition” on a victim who is either a spouse, former spouse, cohabitant, fiancĂ©, partner, or mother or father of the offender’s children.
Another count listed in the court records, 136.1(B)(1), is for seeking to “prevent or dissuade another person who has been the victim of a crime or who is witness to a crime” from reporting it to authorities.
The third count, 242, was for battery, which is defined under California law as “any willful and unlawful use of force or violence upon the person of another.”
On March 12, 1996, Bannon was arraigned. He pleaded not guilty to all the counts and was released on his own recognizance.
A jury trial was called on July 31, 1996, though the trial was “trailed,” meaning it was delayed.
On Aug. 12, 1996, the case was transferred to a different court, and was called for trial. According to the court records, however, the “victim/witness” was “unable to be located.” As a result, the judge ordered the case dismissed.
Five months later, on Jan. 13, 1997, Bannon’s then-wife filed to dissolve their marriage, according to divorce records obtained by POLITICO. She kept physical custody of their two children, whom POLITICO is also not naming. Bannon was ordered to pay her legal fees related to the divorce, child and spousal support -- including child-care and housekeeping, medical insurance and costs, school and extracurricular activity dues, and the children’s undergraduate tuition, room and board. According to the divorce settlement, Bannon was already paying spousal and child support to a wife and child from a previous marriage.
Bannon’s defense attorney on the case, Steven R. Mandell, declined to comment.
 

Keeping your sanity when everyone else appears to be losing theirs

There are many techniques for staying sane when everyone else appears to be losing their sanity because of the times we now live in worldwide. For me, one of my techniques has always been to move to the country where it is beautiful and away from cities whenever I could.

But, for many people this doesn't work for them for a variety of reasons. So, meditation is another way to help. A Good organic foods diet is another way to help and to stay away from all processed foods in regular grocery stores because 70% of them contain GMO (genetically modified organisms) even though they are not legally required to tell you that so they don't.

So, if you die or get ill from GMOs you have no legal ground to prove who you should be suing for your illness or your child's death.

So, moving to the beautiful country, with family or friends if possible, or meditation and eating healthy foods and lots of good exercise breathing healthy air if possible is good.

If you cannot do any these things then you are just going to have to be very innovative in how you stay both sane and alive during the next year here on earth.

By God's Grace

Trump says he is not familiar with Alt-Right

That's funny because Bannon, (the head of Trump's campaign now) IS the most famous spokesman for Alt-Right which is fringe rightest thought too extreme even for Conservative Republicans and head of Breitbart media.

Alt-Right people don't like rights for anyone but white people and don't like women to have rights at all like the right to have an abortion. So, Alt-Right people are the ones who want to take us back to the 1950s when it was more normal to hang black people on their front lawns from their trees and set a cross on fire on their lawns and wear white hoods while doing all this. This is who Alt-Right people tend to be in reality.

They also do things like Trump does like lie to Black people, Hispanic People and people of all races because they are White Nationalist Christians. In other words (Only White people should be in charge worldwide) like Hitler thought. Hitler also killed 6 million men women and children who were believed to be Jewish too. This is Trump's core group of his most enthusiastic supporters, White Nationalists.

Trump: No legal status for undocumented immigrants

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Trump: No legal status for undocumented immigrants

CNN - ‎6 hours ago‎
Washington (CNN) Donald Trump ruled out Thursday a pathway to legal status for undocumented immigrants in the United States, walking back comments he made earlier this week in which he appeared open to the idea.
Interested in Donald Trump?  YesNo
Donald Trump, Wavering on Immigration, Finds Anger in All Corners
Donald Trump's Mixed Signals on Immigration Roil Campaign

Trump: No legal status for undocumented immigrants

Story highlights

  • "There's no path to legalization unless they leave the country," Trump said
  • But he declined to clarify whether he would forcibly deport all of the undocumented immigrants in the US
Washington (CNN)Donald Trump ruled out Thursday a pathway to legal status for undocumented immigrants in the United States, walking back comments he made earlier this week in which he appeared open to the idea.
But the Republican nominee declined in an interview with CNN's Anderson Cooper to clarify whether he would still forcibly deport the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the US -- a major tenet of his immigration platform -- after he suggested this week he was "softening" on the idea.
"There's no path to legalization unless they leave the country," Trump said after an event in Manchester, New Hampshire. "When they come back in, then they can start paying taxes, but there is no path to legalization unless they leave the country and then come back."
Trump said that on his first day in office, he would authorize law enforcement to actively deport "bad dudes," such as those who have committed crimes, which he said numbered "probably millions." But he declined to flatly say whether he would round up other undocumented immigrants, stressing that once the initial deportations occur, "then we can talk."
"There is a very good chance the answer could be yes," Trump said when asked if he would deport those who have lived here peacefully but without papers. "We're going to see what happens."
Trump's comments are the latest turn in a now-daily recalibration of his position on immigration, which Trump said he would crystallize in a speech next week. During the primary, Trump advocated unequivocally for deporting undocumented immigrants, and the shifts he has hinted at would be a highly-scrutinized flip on a trademark issue.
Trump had said earlier this week that he would be open to a "softening" on immigration, and made a series of comments that indicated a path to legalization was likely as long as they paid taxes accumulated from their time living here illegally. Yet Trump now seems to be reverting to his original plan -- one derided as a "touchback" policy in which those without proper papers must return home before re-entering the country.
Yet it was now unclear to what length Trump would go to execute those deportations.
"It's a process. You can't take 11 at one time and just say 'boom, you're gone,'" he told Cooper, floating the idea that as many as 30 million people could be living here illegally, a projection well beyond most analysts' figures. "I don't think it's a softening. I've had people say it's a hardening, actually."
On Wednesday, Trump suggested he would allow exceptions to let some undocumented immigrants to stay in the US, vowing he wouldn't grant them citizenship but telling Fox News, "there's no amnesty, but we work with them."
Trump continued: "No citizenship. Let me go a step further -- they'll pay back-taxes, they have to pay taxes, there's no amnesty, as such, there's no amnesty, but we work with them," Trump told Sean Hannity when asked if he would allow for exceptions to his long-held position.
At the same event with Hannity, Trump, who over the weekend met with Hispanic advisers, said about his immigration policies: "There could certainly be a softening because we're not looking to hurt people."
Clinton's campaign called Trump's plan "dangerous" in a statement Thursday night.
"He may try to disguise his plans by throwing in words like "humane" or " fair," but the reality remains that Trump's agenda echoes the extreme right's will -- one that is fueling a dangerous movement of hatred across the country," Clinton spokeswoman Jennifer Palmieri said.

Calls Clinton a 'bigot'

Trump also defended calling Clinton a "bigot," arguing that her policies are a personal reflection because she knows they are destined to fail minority communities.
Trump and Clinton are each portraying the other as discriminatory toward African-Americans, with Trump charging on Wednesday evening that the candidate herself was hateful. Pushed by Cooper if Trump meant to make a personal argument about Clinton as opposed to a policy argument, Trump doubled down.
"She is a bigot," he said. "She is selling them down the tubes because she's not doing anything for those communities. She talks a good game. But she doesn't do anything."
Asked if he believed Clinton personally hated black people, Trump claimed: "Her policies are bigoted because she knows they're not going to work."

Says he's not familiar with the 'alt-right'

As Clinton tarred him with representing the "alt-right" at a speech in Reno, Nevada, Trump offered his own pushbacks, saying he was not acquainted with the fringe world that Clinton said had essentially merged with his campaign.
"There's no 'alt-right' or 'alt-left.' All I'm embracing is common sense," Trump said. "We're bringing love."
Asked about his controversial new campaign chief, Steve Bannon, who had praised the movement when at Breitbart News, Trump drew some distance: "I don't know what Steve said. All I can tell you: I can only speak for myself."

Plans to visit several African-American churches

And as Trump makes his most overt pitch to African-Americans, Trump said he himself plans to visit several black churches in the next two weeks, including one trip to Detroit.
"I can fix the inner cities," Trump said. "(Clinton) can't."